Whats Your Training System

Pigeon Racing Discussion – What’s Your Training Regimen?

In today’s Pigeon Racing Discussion we would like to know…

What is your training regimen? 

Please include in your comment where you fly, what type of racing you do and give a brief but detailed overview of your training process.

Post your comments in the comments section below now and remember, everyone who participates will be entered to win a “Pigeon Racing Discussion” Prize.

I look forward to reading your comments.

 

32 Comments

  • John

    Reply Reply December 9, 2018

    Hi fellow fanciers i am a south road racer in England farthest we fly 165ish not great but thats what we have got i like all types of racing if you don’t well your better men than me
    I race in two feds at one club so you have a multiple choice on Friday night
    I also race in 5b club at the same marking club so no running about
    As I’m Secretary of 2 clubs and a federation i feel my birds suffer but i do try to train whenever possible
    Ybs my middle granddaughter crates them before i get back from work then they are given a 20 mile toss up to Thursday she also lets them out in the morning to be honest i would struggle without her the ybs flew well enough for me not getting to many prizes but we race with 6 other lofts on allotments so the birds come in around the lower part mine have to fly it then give overfly so just to have them there is encouraging we fly in a strong club with section k average winners plus mnfc section winner’s

  • ray m

    Reply Reply December 8, 2018

    6wks before 1st tosses 5x20km 5x40km 5x 70km 5x100km i only move to next dist when birds leave toss sight without circling then tosses are given in sml groups from 40km x 70 km 5x week then when 1st race tossed when needed Australia

  • Tom Harrison

    Reply Reply December 8, 2018

    Hi everyone,
    I fly my pigeons in Ireland and our longest race upland is around 200 miles,we then fly a channel program starting in Wales which is around 150 miles,then its down to Penzance in England 250 miles 3 times from here and then to France which can be 350 to 450 miles ,also we can join the National Flying Club which has a similar program I race Widowhood for the in land races and then pair up for the channel ,when I separate the cocks and hens after they have reared their young the cocks start buzzing after about 10 days they fly for an hour non stop when they land they take off almost immediately you can see them coming into form ,after a couple of weeks I take them training 30 miles about 4 times before the first race hens are always in their boxes waiting for them,every other day we do the same with the hens to keep them fit I’ll give them a few tosses during the racing to compensate for some fast races if you get 2 or 3 fast races in a row your pigeons will loose fitness they ride the wind and don’t put in the work? Talk about young birds soon
    Cheers Tommy

  • Piet

    Reply Reply December 8, 2018

    What can I do that pigeons trap faster on the short races?

  • Rame

    Reply Reply December 7, 2018

    hi guys , i train tippler pigeons , for 1 race it takes me around 40-55 days , it depends on their condition , weather and other things

  • vergaerde-denolf

    Reply Reply December 6, 2018

    Vergaerde-Denolf: Training Regimen

    Outside the season (September-March), the cock and the hens train every other day. From September to October this is not much (20-30 minutes) because of the moult. From December to March this is several hours!

    At the end of March there will be a link and from then on they will train every day, again not long because of the nest urge. They are being trained on a litter. 1X 40 km, 1X 60 km, 1X 90 km each individually.

    This is followed by a training with the club 1X 100 km, 1X200 km, 1X340 km and 1X 450 km.

    In the season (May – August) there is a compulsory training every day of 1 am, in the late afternoon they get a few hours open loft. When they do not compete, they receive individual training at +/- 60 km once a week, the week before Pau they receive individual training at 260 km.

    This is followed by a re-coupling in function of the international flights that start Pau 920 km- Agen 830 km -Barcelona 1100 km- Saint Vincent 920 km- Marseille 930 km- Narbonne 900 km and Perpignan 950 km.

    Between 2 international flights there is 4 to 5 weeks of rest but they receive individual training at +/- 60 km once a week.

    Now I am curious about your training methods for the extreme long distance.
    Belgium,
    Vergaerde-Denolf

    • Dunc53

      Reply Reply December 7, 2018

      We train 3 times a week 20-30, miles then drop to twice a week when they start to get fit,

      • vergaerde-denolf

        Reply Reply December 7, 2018

        Dun53,

        I’m guessing that those trainings will be in the season.

        Are they individually trained or in group?

  • kurt vergaerde

    Reply Reply December 6, 2018

    I posted this in an other topic but there were no reply’s maybe its beter here.

    sorry for the language but I use a translation machine.

    Dear,
    I would have loved to read more about the guidance of extreme long distance pigeons. Here in Europe we play international races. Barcelona, Perpignan, Narbonne, … It are often 900-1100 km races and these require a different kind of pigeons a different game system, different training, different food … than the regular races.
    We play with an international participation (France, Belgium, Germany, the Netherlands, Luxenburg and U.K.) The pigeons unloaded in Barcelona have to go to the U.K. (in the west) but also to Germany (in the east). The pigeons must have an excellent orientation or otherwise completely lost. In addition, they must be able to fly 15-16 hours a day and possibly continue the following days! Many of the best middle distance / long distance species simply do not have these qualities! On race and middle distance races, results are often determined by location in combination with the wind and the mass also plays a role. In recent years, the game system is also of decisive importance. However, in the international competitions we see little of all this, but the individual class of the pigeon still prevails.
    Personally, I am interested in how they tackle the extreme long distance matches in the rest of the world. Competitions from +900 km with a widespread participation (no non-race races!).

    Belgium
    Vergaerde-Denolf

  • PigeonFan

    Reply Reply December 4, 2018

    Chris, interesting forum, prefer to mask identity as I participate I a very large combine in the US.

    Several years ago I accomplished 1st Combine Old birds of a 500mi race about 2000 birds by trying a tip from the Gallez brothers book of Belgium. It was a yearling cock with large youngsters, they were about 25 days old as he was attending them regularly. The night before shipping I removed both youngsters from the loft by putting them in a basket. On shipping day, afternoon before I grabbed the cock, I presented both youngsters to the nest. He was all excited about seeing them and just as he started to feed them I put him in the race basket. He was a daybird and won 1st place only by a few minutes but it was a great effort beating all of the other highly experienced flyers, it was not me it was all bird that day.

    Training of the birds consists of at least 4 or 5 tosses from 20 to 30miles during the race season. I’ve done this following the recommendation of Charles Heinzman of Kentucky in his youngbird training booklet. Feeding is also very important. You must increase the fat content of the feed for headwind and tough longer races to provide sufficient fuel for the birds to compete effectively.

    • prmpadmin

      Reply Reply December 4, 2018

      Fantastic addition to the thread, thanks for taking the time to post your comments and training system.

  • Alex Marvel

    Reply Reply December 4, 2018

    I read on this forum about pigeon school.
    Also year around loft schedule starting December 1st. I really like the idea of consistency
    I live in Caroline county MD
    Last year started slow at a mile and worked outwards to 50 mile.
    Had a good YB season only loosing 8 birds from the races. I really have no secrets.
    Health that is the Secret.
    Alex Marvel C-410-490-2925

  • ron.goodall

    Reply Reply December 4, 2018

    ive had pigeons since 1984 won the first two races and another one a few weeks later plus minor cards young birds till 1999 i had 1/3 winners and minor places since then no prizes due to my work only flown 2/3 races per year retired 2 years ago at 69yrs of age first year back with y/birds i had young bird sickness so just trained no prizes this year when i took prizes i had help next year 2019 ive got a partner plus bought new stock in none in 20years i will go into training next time

    regards ron

  • Mike

    Reply Reply December 4, 2018

    I have no birds as yet ,I am gathering knowledge first, before I purchase Birds.

    • prmpadmin

      Reply Reply December 4, 2018

      Thats a great idea Mike, it can definitely help when you do things that way. Thanks for posting.

  • Dennis Champness

    Reply Reply December 4, 2018

    Hi Chris I don’t have a training programme
    I’m a beginner I’m asking for help to put one to
    Gether I will be sprint and middle distance racing
    So need advice as to how far to start first toss
    And how far and when to increase it thanks
    For your help dennis

    • prmpadmin

      Reply Reply December 4, 2018

      Hey Dennis, welcome to the family. Have you had a chance to download our beginners handbook? You can do so at http://www.pigeonracingcoach.com i think it will be a good start for you.

  • edi

    Reply Reply December 4, 2018

    Hi

    my birds fly over on a short string tied to leg, this is the best motivation for them. After such training, basket them for a long distance.

    Good race in the winter

    • prmpadmin

      Reply Reply December 4, 2018

      Wow i have never heard of that before. Care to elaborate on it? Thanks for commenting.

  • Yovanis Cruz Riveron

    Reply Reply December 4, 2018

    I will prepare the birds and get them as healthy as possible then start with a 5 miles training twice then 10 miles twice then straight to 20 everyday from Sunday to Thursday, Friday rest and baskets. We only race short distance and I raced natural last year to 214 miles.

    • prmpadmin

      Reply Reply December 4, 2018

      Great program, thanks for sharing it.

  • Casper Laas

    Reply Reply December 4, 2018

    Have no training program, have no idea where to start -feeding etc.
    However, have about 20 winners in stock loft.
    Thx for the mails I have been getting.
    Will send some pics of the loft setup

    • prmpadmin

      Reply Reply December 4, 2018

      Hey Casper, have you had a chance to chexk out our beginners handbook? You can download it for free at http://www.pigeonracingcoach.com along with our other free guides that may be of some help to you.

  • Juan Venter

    Reply Reply December 4, 2018

    I am in the racing pigeon sport in Pretoria , South – Africa. It is very warm here in Pretoria with temperatures up to 36 degrease celcius.

    I am competing in the sprint series. We have 16 sprint races in 16 weeks, every saturday there is a race.

    The races start from 230km to 450km.

    I want you fanciers to help me with the following:
    1. A program with a certain number of distances to follow up to the first race.
    2. A program with distances to follow between each race.
    3. A feeding program from the first toss up to first race.
    4. A feeding program between each race up to the last race.

    Thank you very much. Juan Venter, Pretoria, South Africa

    • prmpadmin

      Reply Reply December 4, 2018

      Hey Juan, thanks for commenting. I will see what i can do to help you get some answers to your questions.

    • Ferdie Lubbe

      Reply Reply December 8, 2018

      The introduction letter to this subject said you can share your secerts on the group as it will be highly unlikely that someone near you will see it.
      Wrong statement as I am also from Pretoris in South-Africa and race with Juan in the same club

      • vergaerde-denolf

        Reply Reply December 9, 2018

        Hi Ferdie,

        Saw that you also train your pigeons individually and experience the benefits.

        Here in Europe at the international races you can not keep the pigeons in line.
        The unloading sites are spread on a line of 600 km. The participation circumference spreads over 800 km and more (from Peasedown UK to deep into Germany.)
        So depending on the mass, the wind direction and the release point, the pigeons always come home at a different angle. Hence the individual training courses and preferably always from another release place that they do not know.

        Furthermore I think there are no secrets in the pigeon sport.

        It is the pigeon fancier who has to learn and has to immediately see when something goes wrong in connection with health, fitness, loft, ventilation, feed, recovery. Through experience we can learn and when we share these experiences we learn much faster and more.

  • Kim martin

    Reply Reply December 3, 2018

    I am a 90klm back marker now we all know that it is a straight line from a to b my problem is that it is across the ocean I have even tossed my birds from my boat trying to get them to fly across the ocean but they still tend to follow the range witch ad’s an extra 10/15 klm I have had a few placings but I am always about 10 min behind the clock bird that macks me dishartend and I am having a year of next year have sold all my young bird race team and will cull some more stock birds and iam undesided if I will race again or even do one loft I have put my heart and soul onto this my birds have to brake away from the main group if any one has any ideas they would be greatly appreciated

    • prmpadmin

      Reply Reply December 4, 2018

      Hey Kim, i know this sport can be frustrating sometimes, please hang in there and i will try and get you some help with your questions. For now please check out some of our free guides at http://www.pigeonracingcoach.com they may be able to help you and more are being developed as we speak.

      • Cesar Rivera

        Reply Reply December 4, 2018

        Hi, I’m from Puerto Rico and we fly over water. They will look to reach land as soon as posible. So I don’t think thats your problem. I think that they aren’t breaking from the pack when they needed. My advice is that you need to training with a friend so they will learn it.

    • Ferdie Lubbe

      Reply Reply December 8, 2018

      Hi Kim racing pigeons are flock birds that will remain with all the order pigeons as long as possible and will only break away once they start to recgonise certain beacons on their way to home and if they are keen emough to get home as fast as possible.
      Best is try find a few beacons 30km, 40km and 50km in line of flight and do single releasing 5- 10minutes apart. Don’t train your birds with the other fanciers before the first race as they will learn bad habbits which you will never correct again.
      They need to establish there own beacons if you want to compete succesfully. By releasing them one by one you quickly sort out the clever ones.
      Applying this method for the first time you must be prepared to lose a lot off follower but you will end-up with quality leaders.
      Now you can start building a family around these leaders. Once you sifted the good from the bad you have time on hand to concentrate on a small team of quality pigeons. Then it’s also easy to practice the motivation technique to make your pigeons extremely keen to get home, either by mating them or widowood system. Y
      You will be surpise to see how quickly you can change your disadvantage into a winning formula. You only need a handfull of topclass pigeons to win racers therefor you must be strong in selection to fine the real diamonds of the sky.
      Good luck

  • prmpadmin

    Reply Reply December 3, 2018

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